August in China: Life in a Tulou

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Despite the gawking tourists, life goes in as usual inside a tulou. People move in and out of the place, though I suspect more out than in given the lures of big city lights for the young ‘uns.

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Young and old still work at the main cash crop of the area, green tea.

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They pick through the dried leaves that come out of special tea leaf dryers.

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They also raise rather cute but slightly feral puppies. These puppies were gamboling about merrily by the tulou well until a villager walked over with some bloody off cuts of meat and casually tossed it at them. Predictably, the puppies tore at the meat with great gusto. I’d taken out my camera to shoot the meat fest but by the time it turned on and focussed, all the meat was gone and all that was left was five puppies with bloody mouths. They looked at me rather hopefully but I was afraid to pet them lest they think my hand was round two of lunch!

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In another part of the tulou lay some cuddly creatures on the other end of the equation. I’m sure these cute white bunnies weren’t raised purely for the kids’ enjoyment. They were mighty adorable though. I wonder how the villagers cook them!

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August in China: Hakka Tulou

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One of the highlights of my trip in South China were the tulou (literally: earth apartments) in the Hakka region of southern Fujian. Here the Hakka tribes migrating down from the north some hundreds of years ago sought shelter in these tall structures made from mud and corn starch. These characteristic circular structures dotted the verdant terraced valleys, making very unique scenery.

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One rumour goes that during the Cold War, US recon planes reported these structures as missile silos!

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Getting in a little closer, it’s hard to imagine how these charming structure could have any remotely military functions.

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Some of these tulou have rather impressive front doors which are kept open all day to let the breeze in.

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On a fine day like the one I was there, the unique curved roof makes a lovely juxtaposition against white cloud and blue sky.

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Some tulou have a double circle structure. The smaller building inside is used as a temple for ancestral worship.

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Next instalment I’ll tell you more about what happens inside the tulou. Now I leave you with what happens when visitors enter: they get served local green tea and chat with the locals.

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