Back to Tulamben: Bottom Dwellers

Page copy protected against web site content infringement by Copyscape

There were lots of creatures living on the bottom, whether on the bottom of a part of the wreck or on the sea floor proper. One of them was the relatively hard-to-spot snowflake moray eel with its startled expression.

IMG_3130

Other eels included the ribbon eel, like this yellow female…

IMG_2906

… and this black juvenile.

IMG_2609

Ribbon eels have a characteristic way of moving in and out of their holes, probably partly moving with the surge and partly to act like a lure for its prey.

Yet other eels we saw were the incredibly shy garden eels. It was impossible to get any closer without chasing them back into their holes.

IMG_3003

I think these are spotted garden eels, but it’s difficult to tell without a close up picture.

IMG_3006

Moving away from the eels, there were other fish that live in holes, like this goby…

IMG_2552

… and this yellowbarred jawfish with its characteristic yellow mark on its eye.

IMG_2807

Then there were the fish that simply sat on the bottom, never being found more than a few centimetres off the coral. Case in point is the leaf scorpionfish.

IMG_2585

At Tulamben, we found the white variation…

IMG_2783

… the yellow variation…

IMG_2603

… and a red variation. Such was the multitude of fish at Tulamben, it was a fish photo collector’s paradise.

IMG_2848

We were also lucky to find a rather hard to find ocellated frogfish. This tiny fella was about an inch or so long and we find him while battling a unexpected strong current. Too bad we weren’t able to stay for too long as I’d certainly like to get a better shot of him.

IMG_3047

And last of all was this deeply depressing stonefish. It’s almost perfectly camouflaged, with only its glum downturned mouth to give itself away.

IMG_2850

A Quick Trip to Redang: Mourning the Coral

Page copy protected against web site content infringement by Copyscape

DC  and I went back to Redang to look up some friends for diving. We were there just as the coral bleaching broke out and were incredibly sad at the poor state of the coral. Global warming had taken its toll and the seas were unseasonably warm this time of the year. To upside was only for me as it was warm enough that I didn’t need to wear a wetsuit, the wuss that I am.

Our first dive was a bit of a shock. Whole patches of the coral had gone ghostly white and the patches stretched far and wide across the coralscape as far as the viz allowed us to see. It didn’t help that the water was a bit murky and the usually brightly coloured coral was completely washed out.

IMG_2154

A lot of the hard coral was affected,, including the staghorn that was bleached from its usual tan to sickly yellow to dead white. It was an incredibly sad sight.

IMG_2159

At some places, it wasn’t too bad, but we could already see the bleaching taking its toll on the outer edges. It was so depressing that the yellow sunflower coral that the other divers liked so much did nothing for me, looking to me as if they were pus-filled fungal colonies taking over the reef.

IMG_2171

Yet, not all dive sites were affected. Only some areas hit by the worst conditions of warm water and unfavourable currents suffered badly. On other reefs, it seemed like life went on as normal, with only minimal bleaching that was hardly noticeable.

IMG_2322

At some areas, I pretty much forgot that the bleaching situation was really bad – there was so much coral and fish life.

IMG_2324

But the diving wasn’t always great. Somehow we ran into a lot of poor visibility, especially in the sandy areas where we saw this blue spotted stingray.

IMG_2291

And this crocodile flathead, also in the sand.

IMG_2193

Things got a little better on the coral itself where there were bigger fish like this grouper.

IMG_2267

And on the coral were the pretty brown-banded pipefish that came in pairs, skittering over the reef with cautious movements.

IMG_2285

The soft coral didn’t seem to be very much affected. It was healthy enough that this lionfish took refuge in it, peering placidly out from its sloe-eyes.

IMG_2275

So all wasn’t quite lost as the reef didn’t seem to be all that dead. It appeared to be rebounding despite the dead patches. We were cheered as we continued our diving.

September in Bali: A Mucky Secret

Page copy protected against web site content infringement by Copyscape

The other highlight of being in Permuteran was diving at Secret Bay. I don’t think it’s that big a secret anymore, but not as many divers go there. It’s a muck diving place, meaning that less of the casual divers and more of the serious divers go there. Why? Because muck diving is all about diving in places with less than white sand and very little coral. The atmosphere can be very depressing because of the low light and poor visibility conditions. Nonetheless, there are plenty of weird and wonderful creatures to see.

I strongly suspect this to be the Kodipungi lionfish, with its separated pectoral fin rays. It’s so beautiful and flamboyant against the dull grey sand.

DSCF1566

What surprised me next was the Banggai cardinalfish, something that is supposed to be very rare. When I’d last dived in Manado, I was told that these fish were only found at Banggai Island and the Lembeh Strait. Balderdash!

DSCF1572

Their blue-black colouration with the almost fluorescent white spots was mesmerising.

DSCF1573

There were also plenty of razorfish among the sea urchins. They were funny creatures that seemed to stand upside down on their noses to hunt for food.

DSCF1628

When pursued, they’d turn ninety degrees so they could make a quick getaway, but were otherwise always nose to the ground.

DSCF1633

Another rare find was the hispid frogfish. It was hilarious how each had a disarmingly charming white pompom on its forehead. This pompom acted like a lure to bring in prey. In a gulp, the poor fish would be gone.

DSCF1624

Another odd fish was the cockatoo waspfish that liked to pretend to be a leaf swaying in the water. Very strange.

DSCF1717

Less strange was this octopus that (for good reason) refused to budge from its hole. The best I could do was to take a blurred shot of its tentacles. Pity.

DSCF1671

Other inhabitants of this freakish side show include the striped puffer with its dark blotch around the base of its pectoral fins making it look recessed and mutated.

DSCF1646

Reflecting the green seaweed was this unidentified goby. It would’ve been difficult to spot if it was just a few inches into the seaweed.

DSCF1597

Easier to identify was the spotted shrimpgoby with its distinctive white iris and black markings. It was surprisingly how I managed to get close enough without startling the shrimpgoby.

DSCF1498

Almost completely camouflaged until it started moving was this peacock flounder with its weirdly asymmetrical eyes.

DSCF1677

Another well-camouflaged fish was this orange and black dragonet, its only giveaway the orange lips.

DSCF1584

There were more – this crocodile flathead, if left alone, would soon change colour to blend in with the sand below.

DSCF1578

There was also this really ugly pipefish that looked like a piece of random trash in the water. No wonder it’s called muck diving.

DSCF1579

Secret Bay was one of the few places where I saw full-sized seahorses, like this thorny seahorse. I was so thrilled by this find! Even though we’re told that pygmy seahorses are very rare, somehow I feel that full-sized ones are even more so because guides tend not to look out for them. What a great find.

DSCF1711

Another unexpected find was this whole pile of schooling catfish in the wreck of a little rowboat.

DSCF1637

Even more surprising was this ornate ghost pipefish floating along obliviously above the seething mass of catfish.

DSCF1641

Other than that, there was a truly horrifying sea centipede, another first for me (and hopefully last).

DSCF1607

And then there were the ubiquitous nudibranchs, though this time nothing I’ve seen before again.

DSCF1603

Check out this scrum of beautiful blue and yellow ones too. Lovely huh.

DSCF1662

And rounding things off, here’s a video of something not seen that often – a white-eye moray eel out of its hole in search of prey. Enjoy.

September in Bali: Underwater

Page copy protected against web site content infringement by Copyscape

The diving at Nusa Lembongan and Nusa Penida was nothing short of beautiful.

DSCF0819

There was plenty of very healthy coral and every single dive was full of beautiful coral scapes, quite different from the black volcanic sands of Tulamben.

DSCF0802

I loved how blue the water was and how colourful the fish were. They were everywhere the eye could see, with the tiny brightly-hued anemonefish hovering on the roof, the slightly bigger ones like the butterflyfish close to the reef and the large ones like the trevally hunting a few metres from the reef.

DSCF1105

It wasn’t all blue underwater. Featherstars like these gave bursts of colour along the way. These creatures are relatives of the starfish and can walk themselves to convenient places to feed. I like how they congregated on this coral to pose for a picture.

DSCF1047

The fish closest to the reef are generally the smallest and naturally the most skittish because they are food for most other bigger fish. I had a hard time getting a picture of these two-tone dartfish that always come in pairs. I love how they look like they’re wearing frilly dark clown pants!

DSCF0865

Another skittish fish was this adorable juvenile yellow boxfish that was almost impossible to catch on camera without being a spotted yellow blur.

DSCF0973

Bigger and less shy, yet still hard to capture was the emperor angelfish. It had this knack of sailing off in a huffy imperial manner away from the camera.

DSCF0940

Also adopting a regal manner was the spotted soapfish. Again, I kept capturing the tails of these fellas till this one though no doubt it’s angled away in retreat.

DSCF0911

Less skittish fish are those that laze along the bottom of the reef, like this hexagon grouper. It perched itself on the coral and anemones, keeping a careful eye on nearby divers and moving away on if they got too close for comfort.

DSCF0866

Others didn’t bat an eyelid even when we got close for a shot, like this giant frogfish. All it did was occasionally shift its foot-like ventral fins to get to a more comfortable position.

DSCF0794

One fish that we daren’t get too close too was the scorpionfish. This specimen is probably either a tasseled or Poss’s scorpionfish, with its well developed skin tassels along its chin and jaw.

DSCF1092

Other things hardly moved at all, like this egg cowrie. Its black mantle covered most its smooth white shell whilst it fed on soft coral.

DSCF1056

Some creatures were actively out hunting, like this very cute snowflake moray eel. It had a most sheepish expression on its face that amused me to no end.

DSCF1084

There was also the banded sea snake, a highly venomous reptile that we steered clear off. From a distance, I admired its pretty bands of alternating black and pale blue, its smooth rounded head and its rudder-like tail that was well adapted to propelling itself in search of prey.

DSCF0826

Last of all was this pretty pink  nudibranch with an orange flower on its back. It’s actually a pink dorid and the flower is its branchial plume through which it breathes. I wonder why it was doubled over though.

DSCF0854

Even without the fish I was after, seeing the variety of life here was rewarding in its own right. More to come in my next post!

Layang Layang: Reef Life and Macro

Page copy protected against web site content infringement by Copyscape

Don’t think that Layang Layang is only for the pelagics. There’s plenty of macro to be found here, it’s only that sometimes the currents and the wall can be a bit challenging for finding those critters and also getting the perfect shot of that tiny little creature. There was a lot of reef life here, such as this rather surprised looking tomato grouper.

IMG_1318a

I was also quite pleased to see one of my favourites, a juvenile black snapper with its characteristic black and white stripes and dots.

IMG_1295a

Then there were the fish that insisting on posing for a picture, like this slightly constipated looking pennant bannerfish.

IMG_1260

There were also bottom dwellers like blue-spotted stingrays.

IMG_1325a

They always seem to stare up so malevolently at us.

IMG_0610

There were also other fairly amusing fish, like this doublebar goatfish. They like to rest on coral and pretend that they are not there, innocently spacing out, as if if they can’t see us we can’t see them!

IMG_0930a

Others showed off their colours beautifully against the coral, like these panda butterflyfish and peacock grouper.

IMG_1181

DC is obsessed with the pufferfish family, just like I’m obsessed with hawkfish. His favourite shot of the whole trip is this seal-faced puffer that he cornered in a coral niche. It’s cute, isn’t it?

IMG_0578

Not so cute is this giant frogfish that has its mouth open in wait for unsuspecting prey. In a split second, it’ll pounce and the prey will be in its belly.

IMG_0892a

Far less grotesque were pretty nudibranchs slowly making their way across the coral gardens.

IMG_0986

They were surprisingly hard to spot among the colourful backdrop of coral, but once found, a joy to photograph.

IMG_1219a

Far harder to photograph were the pink anemonefish, who were so skittish, this is probably the only decent one I got amongst the tens of shots I took.

IMG_1210a

Going down to the seriously macro-level, I found some large whip gobies on a sea fan and thankfully this one wasn’t as shy as my next subject.

IMG_1268a

The Denise pygmy seahorses were such a pain to photograph. My camera had great difficulty focussing on the tiny creatures smaller than my fingernail. This one is pregnant and had the tendency to swim to the underside of the sea fan, making it impossible to catch on camera.

IMG_1033a

DC got this picture that’s far superior to mine, it’s so beautiful how he managed to capture the eye and its almost serene expression.

IMG_0616a

We had some good luck on sandy patches at the house reef at night. There was a flamboyantly coloured Spanish dancer.

IMG_0520

There was also this strange blob of a sea slug oozing its way along.

IMG_0539

Much prettier was this variation of a reeftop pipefish that wiggled its pretty pink tail and didn’t seem to mind the many flashes from our cameras.

IMG_1144a

Then there was the bizarrely shaped longhorn cowfish that seemed to have difficulty navigating its way out of this patch of seagrass.

IMG_1163a

Back on the coral reef, there were other oddities like this leaf scorpionfish with its glassy white eye staring out at us while swaying back and forth in the water pretending to be a leaf.

IMG_1101a

In the anemone were some porcelain crabs, which were quite shy. This one kept scuttling towards the underside of the anemone and it was really hard to keep up with it before it disappeared from sight.

IMG_1066a

A rare sight in the coral was this peacock flounder. Normally associated with muck diving, I was thrilled to see this one swim along and then try to rather unsuccessfully camouflage itself on some maze coral. Its googly eyes and patchy colouration gave it away immediately!

IMG_1055a

There were also quite a few shrimp and other crustaceans hiding out in crevices. Here’s DC trying to get a good snap of some shrimp.

IMG_1226

They were some kind of orange cleaner shrimp that I have yet to identify, very pretty though!

IMG_1224

Other cleaner shrimp like these commensal shrimp also hung around the same area. Both kinds would come out onto my hand and pick away at dead skin. I suppose it makes good eating for them. And round goes the circle of life!

IMG_1221a

There were also these spiny rock lobsters in another hole. I was so tempted to pull them out by their feelers but of course resisted. It’s a pity they were so shy though!

IMG_1330

Back on the surface of the coral reef, we were happy to see the bigger fish thriving. There were plenty of sweetlips about, including these adult harlequin sweetlips that seemed to love giving a mirror mirage by going in pairs above and below the coral.

IMG_1354

Then there was this emperor angelfish that came up to pose for a picture on my last dive. Such an obliging creature!

IMG_1337a

And last of the fish, there was this white mouth moray looking out for prey.

IMG_1284a

Unfortunately, as this video shows, it’s a bit of FAIL because it got slapped in the face by a passing fish. So much for being a lean, mean predator.

The nicest finale to our dive was getting up close to this turtle. As we approached, the green turtle was facing us and knew full well of our approach. Somehow it didn’t swim away.

IMG_1369a

DC got in close enough for a really macro shot of it.

IMG_0678

But then we noticed something odd about the way it was rocking back and forth.

We realised that it was stuck in the coral! For the sake of this turtle, I broke one of the laws of diving – don’t touch any creature – and tugged it gently out. It got free and immediately coasted up towards the surface for a good breath of fresh air.

IMG_1370

It was such a lovely feeling to end our successful series of dives by helping out a stranded turtle.